A People’s Journey

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In 1921, the deadliest racial massacre in U.S. history occurred in the Greenwood African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Black Tulsans had formed their own community along Greenwood & Archer streets that became known as “Black Wall Street,”and included several groceries, two independent newspapers, two movie theaters, nightclubs, and numerous churches.

In the 1830s the first African Americans came to the Oklahoma Territory with Native Americans along the Trail of Tears. Some were enslaved, and some were free. After Emancipation, they settled throughout the territory and founded several all-black towns.

By 1900 African Americans composed 7 percent of the combined Oklahoma and Native American Territories and 5 percent of Tula’s population.

#OnThisDay in 1921, the deadliest racial massacre in U.S. history occurred in the Greenwood African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Black Tulsans had formed their own community along Greenwood & Archer streets that became known as “Black Wall Street,”and included several groceries, two independent newspapers, two movie theaters, nightclubs, and numerous churches. In the 1830s the first African Americans came to the Oklahoma Territory with Native Americans along the Trail of Tears. Some were enslaved, and some were free. After Emancipation, they settled throughout the territory and founded several all-black towns. By 1900 African Americans composed 7 percent of the combined Oklahoma and Native American Territories and 5 percent of Tula’s population. #APeoplesJourney #Tulsa1921 📸: First Photograph of the Cotten family, 1902, Gift of the Families of Anita Williams Christopher and David Owen Williams. Second and third Photographs Gift of Princetta R. Newman, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Black Dispatch newspaper, June 11, 1921.

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